Immigration Blog

Alexander J. Segal's picture

FAM Update: Length of Stay Increased for Certain B1 Personal/Domestic Employees

The new provision, found in 9 FAM 41.31 N9.3-2(b), increases the maximum length of stay for a personal/domestic employee on a B1 visa in this case from 4 years to 6 years.

Alexander J. Segal's picture

Ninth Circuit Holds Nevada Statute to be Categorically a CIMT

On November 2, 2015, the Ninth Circuit rendered an interesting decision in a case titled Mancilla-Delafuente v. Lynch.

Alexander J. Segal's picture

Vermont Service Center Stops Processing Form I-918s Due to U Visa Cap

The Vermont Service Center (VSC) VAWA/U/T Unit, which processes U visa applications, notified AILA on November 13, 2015, that it will stop processing Form I-918s (the petition for U nonimmigrant status) because it is currently focused on updating U visa cap numbers.

Alexander J. Segal's picture

2016 Presidential Candidate Profile: Chris Christie

Governor Christie is my first choice for President in 2016, and I urge readers to look closely at his record and give him careful consideration. The skills that Governor Christie has shown in advancing conservative reforms in Democratic New Jersey are precisely what we need in the White House. It would be a great loss if his current low poll numbers prevent him from getting a proper hearing from the American people.

Alexander J. Segal's picture

Department of State Releases Refugee Resettlement Fact Sheet

On October 21, 2015, the Department of State (DOS) released a Fact Sheet titled “Refugee Resettlement in the United States.” The Fact Sheet has a few interesting notes and charts that I would like to share with you.

Alexander J. Segal's picture

Announcing a Series of Blog Posts: My 2016 Presidential Candidate Profiles

There are few issues more important to immigration law – and our republic as a whole – than who occupies the White House. Thus, as we fast approach the first votes of this 2016 Presidential election, I have decided to write a series of candidate profiles about each of the important 2016 Presidential hopefuls.

Melsida Asatrian's picture

Unaccompanied Minors at the Southwest Border

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) recently released statistics regarding the apprehension of unaccompanied alien children or unaccompanied minors during Fiscal Year 2015. You can find these statistics and other information about the apprehension of unaccompanied minors at www.cbp.gov. An unaccompanied alien child is a child who has no lawful immigration status in the United States, has not reached the age of 18, and has no parent or legal guardian in the United States who can provide care and physical custody.

Alexander J. Segal's picture

BIA Requests Briefs on Whether False Statements Must be "Material" to Constitute an Aggravated Felony "Involving Deceit"

On November 10, 2015, the Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA) invited interested members of the public to submit an amicus curiae (friend of the court) brief discussing the following question: “In determining whether an offense constitutes an aggravated felony under section 101(a)(43)(M)(i) of the Act, 8 U.S.C. § 1101(a)(43)(M)(i), must false statements be “material” in order to find that the statute “involves deceit”? The parties may address other issues pertinent to the case.”

Alexander J. Segal's picture

Attorney General Refers Two BIA Decisions to Herself for Review

Attorney General Loretta Lynch referred two Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA) decisions to herself for review. The decisions are Matter of Chairez (decided February 11, 2015) and Matter of Sama (decided July 17, 2015). Pending the Attorney General’s review, the BIA’s decision in both cases are automatically stayed. The Attorney General is reviewing the cases to determine whether they are consistent with the Supreme Court’s decision in Descamps v. United States (decided June 20, 2013). In this article, I will explain how this referral process works, the main issue that the Attorney General is considering, and the possible effects of this review going forward.

Melsida Asatrian's picture

USCIS Offers Benefits to Spouses, Children, and Parents of Active Members of the U.S. Armed Forces, Individuals in the Selected Reserves, and Veterans

The Obama Administrative has used executive action to expand the use of parole to assist members of the armed forces, individuals in the reserves, and veterans. Parole is typically used to permit an alien who is outside the United States to enter the United States, but the Department of Homeland Security has recognized that parole may granted to an alien who is physically present in the United States without inspection or admission.

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