Immigration Blog

Eliza Grinberg's picture

EOIR Releases Updated Immigration Court Statistics

On May 9, 2018, the Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR) released immigration court statistics for the first two quarters of fiscal year 2018. The publication of these statistics is part of the EOIR’s new transparency initiative, which will involve “releasing immigration court data on a recurring basis.” In this post, we will discuss some of the highlights from the statistics that were noted by the EOIR.

Wendy Barlow's picture

Texas Attorney General Announces Non-Citizen Voter Fraud Charges

On May 14, 2018, Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton announced that his office had filed charges against a non-U.S. citizen for two counts of election fraud related to the November 2016 presidential election. In this post, we discuss the criminal charges and how unlawful voting can also be a civil immigration violation.

Wendy Barlow's picture

DHS to Terminate TPS for Honduras

On May 4, 2018, Secretary of Homeland Security Kirstjen Nielsen announced her determination to terminate the Temporary Protected Status (TPS) designation for Honduras. Honduras initial TPS designation date was January 5, 1999. The current TPS designation for Honduras runs through July 5, 2018. However, instead of immediately terminating Honduras TPS on July 5, 2018, Secretary Nielsen opted to delay the termination for 18 months to ensure an orderly transition, meaning the termination of TPS for Honduras will occur on January 5, 2020.

Eliza Grinberg's picture

AG Sessions References New DHS Policy to Refer 100% of Illegal Southwest Border Crossings for Prosecution

In a May 7 speech, Attorney General Sessions made an important announcement regarding a new DHS policy for making criminal referrals: “[T]he Department of Homeland Security is now referring 100 percent of illegal Southwest Border crossings to the Department of Justice for prosecution. And the Department of Justice will take up those cases.” In our initial post on the Zero Tolerance policy, we noted that the DOJ relies on the DHS to refer arrestees for criminal prosecution. In the alternative, the DHS can opt to pursue only civil immigration charges and not refer an individual for criminal prosecution. While we explained that there were signs that DHS would increase referrals, there was no policy announcement. Now, Attorney General Sessions has announced referenced the DHS’s new referral policy.

Eliza Grinberg's picture

DHS to Terminate TPS for Nepal

On April 26, 2018, Secretary of Homeland Security Kirstjen Nielsen announced the termination of the Temporary Protected Status (TPS) designation for Nepal. Nepal’s current TPS designation began on June 24, 2015. Nepal’s current TPS extension runs through June 24, 2018. In order to ensure an orderly transition for Nepal TPS beneficiaries, Secretary Nielsen determined that the termination of Nepal TPS would be delayed for 12 months. Accordingly, the TPS designation for Nepal will terminate on June 24, 2019.

Eliza Grinberg's picture

Attorney General Sessions Sends AUSAs and IJs to Border to Respond to Increase in Illegal Crossings and Asylum Cases

On May 2, 2018, the Department of Justice (DOJ) published a news release titled “Justice Department Announces Additional Prosecutors and Immigration Judges For Southwest Border Crisis.”. The news release discusses U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessons’ decision to send additional Assistant United States Attorneys (AUSAs) and immigration judges to locations along the Southwest Border to assist in the prosecution and processing of cases along border. In this post, we will discuss each component of this news release and related background information.

Eliza Grinberg's picture

USCIS Completes FY-2019 CW1 Lottery

On May 2, 2018, the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) announced that it had competed the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI)-Only Transitional Worker (CW1) cap lottery for fiscal year 2019.

Alexander J. Segal's picture

Trump v. Hawaii "Travel Ban" Oral Argument Recap Part Three: Oral Argument In Opposition to the Entry Restrictions

In this article, we will examine the oral arguments of Neal K. Kaytal before the Supreme Court on behalf of the respondents in Trump v. Hawaii. The case concerns challenges to the legality of the entry restrictions against nationals of seven countries set forth in President Donald Trump’s September 24, 2017 Presidential Proclamation titled “Enhancing Vetting Capabilities and Processes for Detecting Attempted Entry Into the United States by Terrorists or Other Public-Safety Threats.”

Alexander J. Segal's picture

Trump v. Hawaii "Travel Ban" Oral Argument Recap Part Two: Oral Argument In Favor of the Entry Restrictions

In this article, we will examine the oral arguments of Solicitor General Noel J. Francisco on behalf of the Government in Trump v. Hawaii, the case concerning the legality of President Donald Trump’s entry restrictions against nationals of seven countries in President Trump’s September 24, 2017 Presidential Proclamation titled “Enhancing Vetting Capabilities and Processes for Detecting Attempted Entry Into the United States by Terrorists or Other Public-Safety Threats.”

Alexander J. Segal's picture

Trump v. Hawaii "Travel Ban" Oral Argument Recap Part One: Introduction

On April 25, 2018, the Supreme Court of the United States heard oral arguments in Trump v. Hawaii, No. 17-695. Trump v. Hawaii concerns the entry restrictions against nationals of seven countries in President Donald Trump’s September 24, 2017 Presidential Proclamation titled “Enhancing Vetting Capabilities and Processes for Detecting Attempted Entry Into the United States by Terrorists or Other Public-Safety Threats.” These restrictions are colloquially known as the “travel ban.” In this article, we will examine how we arrived at the oral arguments in Trump v. Hawaii. In the conclusion of the article, we provide links to our two summaries of the oral arguments.

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