Immigration Blog

Ninth Circuit to Post Live Stream of Oral Arguments in State of Washington v. Trump (3:00 PM 2/7/17)

Written by Alexander J. Segal on

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On February 7, 2017, at 3:00 PM, the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit will conduct oral arguments in the 17-35105 State of Washington v. Trump.  The issue at hand is the temporary restraining order (TRO) issued against certain provisions of President Donald Trump’s Executive Order suspending entry for aliens from seven specified countries. For those who are interested, the Ninth Circuit will have a live stream of the oral arguments on its website beginning at 3:00 PM.

President Trump's Executive Order Part 2: Legal and Policy Analysis

Written by Alexander J. Segal on

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In this article, I assess the most contested provisions of President Trump’s Executive Order, titled “Protecting the Nation from Foreign Terrorist Entry into the United States” (82 FR 8977 (Jan. 27, 2017)) as a matter of legal soundness and policy. Before reading this article, please see my blog on the controversial provisions of the EO as well as our website’s detailed analysis of section 212(f) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA).

President Trump's Executive Order Part 1: Legal Overview

Written by Alexander J. Segal on

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Late in the afternoon on January 27, 2017, President Donald Trump issued an executive order (EO) titled “Protecting the Nation from Foreign Terrorist Entry into the United States” (82 FR 8977 (Jan. 27, 2017)). The two most prominent provisions of the EO – those dealing with suspending refugee admissions and processing for 120 days (and suspending processing from Syria until further notice from the President) and those suspending entry by nationals from seven countries – have become national news. Between the initially muddled implementation of the EO, inaccurate media reports, and the number of provisions of immigration law cited, it can be hard to separate fact from fiction for experts and laymen alike. In this article, I will examine the controversial portions of the EO and explore and their legal basis as written and in the immigration laws. After reading this post, please see my second post on whether the provisions of the EO represent good law and policy.

White House Counsel Holds that Executive Order Does Not Apply to LPRs

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On February 1, 2017, the Counsel to the President, Donald F. McGahn II, issued a Memorandum to the then-Acting Secretary of State, the Acting Attorney General, and the Secretary of Homeland Security titled “Authoritative Guidance on Executive Order Entitled ‘Protecting the Nation from Foreign Terrorist Entry into the United States’ (Jan. 27, 2017).” Specifically, the Memorandum clarifies to the Secretary of State, the Attorney General, and the Secretary of Homeland Security that the Executive Order does not apply to lawful permanent residents of the United States (LPRs).

Update on Immigration Executive Order and Dual Nationals

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As of January 31, 2017, the application of President Donald Trump’s Executive Order (EO) titled “Protecting the Nation From Foreign Terrorist Entry Into the United States” to dual nationals who of one of the affected countries and an unaffected country remains unclear. However, there have been several updates on the issue that I thought would be worth sharing.

Analysis of President Trump's Decision to Replace Sally Yates as Acting Attorney General

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On January 30, 2017, President Donald Trump relieved Acting Attorney General Sally Yates of her duties after she ordered the Department of Justice to not defend his immigration Executive Order in court. The President replaced Yates with the U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Virgina, Dana Boente. In this post, I offer my analysis of what transpired.

President Trump Nominates Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court

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On January 31, 2017, President Donald Trump nominated Judge Neil Gorsuch of the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit to the United States Supreme Court.  In so doing, President Trump fulfilled his campaign promise to pick a well-qualified conservative jurist from his list of twenty-one potential nominees.

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