Immigration Blog

Senate Confirms Dan Coats as Fifth Director of National Intelligence

Written by Alexander J. Segal on

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On March 15, 2017, the United States confirmed Dan Coats as the new Director of National Intelligence by a vote of 85-12. The Director of National Intelligence is a cabinet-level official who directs and oversees the National Foreign Intelligence Program as the head of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI).

USCIS to Begin Accepting CW1 Petitions Subject to the FY-2018 Cap on April 3, 2017

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On March 9, 2017, the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) announced that it would begin accepting CW1 petitions subject to the fiscal year (FY) 2018 cap on April 3, 2017. The CW1 category is for employers in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands who are seeking to employ foreign workers who would be otherwise ineligible to work under the other nonimmigrant work visa categories.

District Judge Issues Temporary Restraining Order Against Two Provisions of President Trump's March 6 Travel Order

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On March 15, 2017, Judge Derrick K. Watson of the United States District Court for the District of Hawaii issued a temporary restraining order against sections 2 and 6 of President Donald Trump’s Executive Order titled “Protecting the Nation from Foreign Terrorist Entry into the United States” (“Travel Order”).  The decision is titled Hawaii v. Trump, CV No. 17-0050.

Archived Article: ICE FAQ on Obama-Era Civil Enforcement Priorities

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On November 20, 2014, the Secretary of Homeland Security, Jeh Johnson, released a Memorandum detailing three distinct levels of civil immigration enforcement priorities for the immigration components of the DHS. The priorities set forth in the Memorandum are guidance for the officers of the Customs and Border Protection (CBP), Immigrations and Customs Enforcement (ICE), and United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). The November 2014 civil enforcement priorities have since been replaced by a new set of enforcement priorities on February 20, 2017. This article is archived for informational purposes only.

E-Verify Employers Have Through March 31, 2017, to Download Historic Records Report of E-Verify Records More Than 10 Years Old

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Each year, the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) disposes of E-Verify records that are over 10 years old. In accordance with records retention and disposal policies, the USCIS will delete E-Verify records over 10 years old on April 1, 2017. This article cotains information regarding downloading E-Verify Historic Records Reports prior to the deletion of old E-Verify records.

Why AILA's "Justice Campaign" Misses the Mark on Advocacy During the Trump Administration

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I receive various communications from the American Association of Immigration Lawyers (AILA) due to my being a member and having attended many AILA conferences. Followers of my blog will likely notice that the opinions I express on immigration are well right of those expressed by most immigration attorneys and advocates seen in the media. In this post, I will examine areas where I agree with AILA and disagree with AILA in a post about its new “Justice Campaign.”

Supreme Court Rules that Void-for-Vagueness Doctrine Does Not Apply to Federal Sentencing Guidelines

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On March 6, 2017, the Supreme Court of the United States issued a decision titled Beckles v. United States, No. 15-8544 (2017). Beckles is not an immigration case and is unlikely to have a direct effect on immigration law. However, it is tangentially related to the Supreme Court decision in Johnson v. United States, 576 U.S. __ (2015), which does have an effect on certain immigration statutes. As a matter of interest, we will review the Beckles decision in brief and explain how it is related to Johnson.

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